Amalfi Coast: A Traveler’s Guide to see the top things

Continuing our Roman adventure, we picked up and dropped off the rental car at the Fiumicino airport and drove to the Amalfi Coast. For budget planning, this seemed to be the best option for our trip. Visiting this beautiful place had long been a dream of ours, inspired by the countless stunning photographs we had seen. We were eager to see if the reality matched the hype. While we were impressed, we found that Positano wasn’t our favorite destination on the Amalfi Coast, despite being the one most often associated with it. Though not known for being budget-friendly, Positano is still accessible to those on a modest budget.

Updated January 2024

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After careful planning, we decided to base ourselves in Furore, which is located approximately halfway between Positano and Ravello. We intended to explore this part of the coastline, so we rented a room in Furore. The accommodation included a restaurant where we enjoyed the delicious grilled swordfish, our favorite dish during our stay. There are great websites where you can search for hotels and apartments according to your preferences and budget. Such as Hotellook helps you find and compare prices on hotels around the world. I wish you a successful search.

How to get around the Amalfi coast

If we arrive in Naples by plane, it is worth taking the train to Sorrento, and after changing trains we can take the bus to our destination. Trainline has a great interface to help find schedules and prices, as well as to buy tickets.

Transportation is essential in this area, and for those with experience, a scooter proves to be the best option due to its flexibility and ease of parking, which can be difficult and expensive in the region. The regular bus service is a compromise, but it offers a unique experience of driving along the narrow and winding coastal road. However, buses can be quite full during peak season.

The bus timetable can be found on the official website of Positano. They don’t always keep to it, but you should be there in time.

Another delightful option for exploring the Amalfi Coast is to use boats that travel between the settlements. The boats run regularly, offering comfortable and fast transportation while providing impressive views of the steep coast. The timetable can be found on the official website of Travelmar. It is not necessary to buy the ticket in advance, it is for a specific boat anyway, and it is not valid for an earlier or later boat.
It is worth trying both boat and bus tours on the Amalfi Coast, so that you can see wonderful places from different points of view.

Traveling by car on the Amalfi Coast is not always the easiest due to the narrow roads and often difficult parking, but it offers an unforgettable experience for the driving enthusiast. Be sure to compare car rental prices to find the best deal. Discover Cars has a great interface to find the best car rental price, they also offer 24/7 support and free cancellation.

Path of the God, Sentiero Degli Dei

One of the must-visit attractions on the Amalfi Coast is the “Path of the Gods,” Sentiero Degli Dei, which links the towns of Bomerano and Positano. The trail stretches 7 km along the steep mountainside and can be completed in 3.5 hours if you’re in a hurry, but it’s better to take your time and enjoy the breathtaking views. However, I wouldn’t recommend it for young children, as the terrain can be quite rough in places.

Our host was very kind and took us by car to Piazza P.Capasso (Bomerano Centro). If you arrive by bus, you have to get off here as well. This is where the trail begins. There’s a buffet (Punto Ristoro Il Caffe Degli Dei) at the beginning of the trail where you can purchase cold drinks, coffee, and various sandwiches.
After a while, you come to a fork in the road. We turned right. It should have been left. So we took a path uphill and didn’t have the chance to stop at Ulisse’s, where you can refresh yourself with a cold lemonade. After a while, of course, the two routes merged and we returned to normal. But I’ve regretted it ever since. The trail actually ends in Nocelle, not Positano. From here you can take a bus down to Positano. There is also a staircase next to the church leading down to the main road (Via Arienzo, 53), but we did not take it. Maybe next time we correct the mistake of going in the wrong direction. Overall, I really enjoyed it and I’m glad we did it, I would do it again.

Path of the God, Sentiero Degli Dei
Path of the God, Sentiero Degli Dei
Path of the God, Sentiero Degli Dei
Path of the God, Sentiero Degli Dei
Path of the God, Sentiero Degli Dei

Fiordo di Furore

The Fiordo di Furore is Furore’s main attraction—a narrow gorge carved out by the Schiato stream flowing from the mountain into the sea. Unfortunately, when we visited, the entrance to the stairs leading down to the fjord was bricked up, thoughmay have been been corrected since then. On the shore there is a group of houses where the old fishermen live. The fjord is the oldest part of Furore. The town center is 300 meters above sea level. The coastal road crosses the fjord on a viaduct.
A very impressive place. It can get quite crowded in the summer.

Fiordo di Furore
Fiordo di Furore

Positano

During our trip, we also spent some time in Positano, walking along its main streets to the beach. It’s a popular destination, especially for taking Instagram-worthy photos with the colorful houses on the steep hillside in the background. However, we found that the water and air quality could be better due to the large number of boats and tourists.

When we made the Sentiero Degli Dei, we got off the bus and walked along the main streets of the town to the beach (unfortunately we didn’t have time to get lost in the town), where we rested from the tour and took a dip in the sea. From a beach point of view, Positano is not the best choice. With many boats arriving and departing every day, the water is not the cleanest one here. It’s a bit gassy. And the free beach is right next to the harbor. The situation can be a bit better on the paid beach. As we weren’t here for the whole day, we chose the free beach.

Positano
Positano
Positano

Amalfi

Amalfi, with its beautiful beach of Atrani, located east of Marina Grande, is another charming destination. The beach offers a refreshing break from the crowds. Additionally, the town boasts several architectural attractions, including the imposing St. Andrew’s Cathedral.

We came here twice in 6 days. On the one hand you can walk around the narrow streets of the town, on the other hand you can go to the beach, to the beautiful beach of Atrani, which is the main beach of Amalfi. Located east of Marina Grande (pebble beach, close to the center, umbrellas and sunbeds can be hired), 10 minutes walk away, one of the most beautiful beaches in the Amalfi area. Popular with families with young children. Usually, an uncrowded beach, refreshing after the crowds of Amalfi. Like almost all the beaches on the Amalfi Coast, it is pebbly. As the boats do not stop here, the beach is much, much nicer and more pleasant. The panorama is also impressive, with the winding main road and the church in the background.

As well as the beach and the beautiful scenery, there are several architectural attractions to visit. Amalfi’s main attraction is its imposing cathedral, St Andrew’s. Located in Piazza Duomo, in the heart of Amalfi, the cathedral was built in the 13th century, but also contains parts from the 9th century. It has been rebuilt and renovated several times since the 13th century.

In Amalfi we parked in the Parcheggio Luna Rossa car park, though be cautious as it is quite narrow. From the car park you enter the town through a tunnel and arrive next to the Amalfi Cathedral. The lemons grown in the area and the limoncello made from them are famous. Be sure to try it.

Amalfi
Amalfi

Ravello

Ravello, located 7 km east of Amalfi, is a secluded and romantic place. It can be reached by bus in 25 minutes and offers a plethora of sights, with Villa Rufolo and Villa Cimbrone being top attractions. Another highlight of Ravello is its 11th-century cathedral.

Among the many sights, these are the two we remember most.
Villa Rufolo in Ravello (admission 8 EUR, 5-12 years old and 6 EUR over 65, open 9:00-18:00) and Villa Cimbrone, which also serves as a hotel (admission 10 EUR, open daily from 9:00 until sunset), from its beautiful garden you have a beautiful view of the Amalfi Coast. These are among the TOP attractions of the Amalfi Coast and are well worth a visit. The first part of the following photos is about Villa Rufulo, and the second part is about Villa Cimbrone. For more information about the two villas, visit the official Ravello site.

Ravello
Ravello
Ravello

Island of Capri

Finally, we uniquely discovered the island of Capri—by sailing around it on a motorboat. Though we didn’t explore the island on foot during this visit, we found this approach provided a different perspective and a rich experience. We plan to return to the island to explore it further in the future.

In Sorrento from where the boats depart for Capri, we parked at Parcheggio Stinga.

Island of Capri
Island of Capri

Summary

The “Path of the Gods” is a must-visit attraction on the Amalfi Coast, a 7 km trail linking Bomerano and Positano. The trail is 7 km long and can be completed in 3.5 hours, but it’s better to take your time and enjoy the breathtaking views. The Fiordo di Furore is another main attraction, a narrow gorge carved out by the Schiato stream flowing from the mountain into the sea. The town center is 300 meters above sea level and the coastal road crosses the fjord on a viaduct. Positano can get crowded in the summer, and the water quality could be better due to the large number of boats and tourists. Atrani, located east of Marina Grande, is another charming destination with a refreshing break from the crowds and several architectural attractions, including the imposing St. Andrew’s Cathedral. It’s also popular destination for taking Instagram-worthy photos with colorful houses on the steep hillside in the background. Overall, Amalfi coastline is a great place to visit, but not recommended for young children due to rough terrain.

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